POP QUIZ!

POP QUIZ:
Here’s a new quiz for you all!
One of these weird wedding traditions is a real practice. The other two are fake. Respond in the comments or with a FB message with what you think is the REAL wedding tradition (no Googling, people! Just your best guess) by the end of tomorrow, and the correct answers will be entered into a drawing for a special prize: a cool postcard from somewhere in the world.
READY?

1. A Ghanaian tribe’s tradition states that before a man can marry, the potential groom and his future father-in-law must race through sometimes thick forest – on only one leg – from the groom’s village to the bride’s village. If the groom loses the race, the wedding is off!

2. In some Hindu belief, a bride (or groom) that is born under certain a certain unfavorable astrological sign will be doomed to an unhappy marriage. The situation can be remedied, according to some traditions, by the afflicted partner first marrying a tree. If the tree is then burned, the effects of the bad luck will be nullified.

3. In far northern Norway, some villages still practice an old tradition: The entire village gathers to throw fish innards at a newly married couple as soon as they emerge from the wedding tent. It’s believed to bestow good fortune on the couple.

Okay, pick which one you think it is and either respond in comments or by email!

Quiz: Where in the World are the Misadventurists?

by Stax

Beej and I are sometimes so intent on not following the beaten path that we do things like visit major tourist attractions at night when everything we would want to see is already closed. Then instead of sleeping in regular places like “beds,” we opt for open-air train station benches, covering ourselves with sleeping bags, huddling together for warmth while enjoying the company of one tweaked-out local as he tries to feed us sausages in between spastically moving about and talking to himself in rapid Czech.

Whomever correctly guesses the name of the historical site one kilometer away from where Beej and I spent the night on the train station bench –  email us at misadventuristfilms@gmail.com OR send us a private message on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pages/Misadventurist-Films

 If the answer is correct, we’ll put your name in a drawing. The person whose name we draw will receive a prize: a postcard from wherever we are with your very own personalized note!

Here is the clue:

In 1278, Henry, the abbot of a certain Cistercian monastery, was sent to the Holy Land by King Otakar II of Bohemia. He returned with a pocket full of Golgatha dirt and sprinkled it over the abbey cemetery. The word of this act spread throughout Central Europe and the cemetery became a desirable burial site.

Conveniently, the monks somehow figured out that one year was enough for your bones to be buried for you to receive complete absolution. And then they could dig up your body and sell your plot to the next person.

With the combination of Black Death running rampant throughout Europe and the 30 Years War, this nifty profit scheme became a bit untenable. The graveyard filled up much too quickly for even a one year corpse residency to be viable.

By 1511 half-blind monks (or blind depending on your sources) were tasked with exhuming skeletons and stacking their bones in the chapel.

By 1870, the House of Schwarzenberg had taken over the chapel and decided it was time to put the 40,000 bones to rest. They hired a local woodcarver, František Rint, who artistically arranged them into some of the most interesting and macabre art.

Guess the name of this historical site. We’ll announce the winner in 3 days (July 9)!